Use these suggestions to assist your youngster in improving their reading abilities.

For early readers, beginning with picture books, mastering reading comprehension abilities is crucial. 

It will aid school-age youngsters in understanding textbooks, news articles, and other complex literature as they get older.

Here are six suggestions to help your early reader improve their reading comprehension abilities in addition to the many grade-appropriate reading comprehension exercise books that Scholastic offers.

1. Request that they read aloud. 

They are prompted to read more slowly, which allows them more time to think about what they are to read and enhances their reading comprehension

Additionally, kids are hearing the words as well as seeing them! 

Additionally, you can alternate reading aloud.

2. Offer literature at the appropriate level. 

3. Read aloud to improve fluency. 

Your child must read fast and fluently to understand content and foster to read comprehension. This ability is referred to as fluency. 

For instance, your child should be able to read 90 words per minute by the start of the third grade.

4. Consult the instructor. 

If your child is having trouble understanding what they are to read, they might benefit from additional support with vocabulary development or phonics practise.

5. Extend the reading they did in class. 

If your child’s class is studying a certain topic, search for books or publications that are simple to read about the subject. 

Their ability to navigate more challenging school texts and improve literacy comprehension will be aided by some past knowledge.

Make sure that your reader who is in school receives enough of practice to read books that aren’t too challenging. 

They should be able to identify at least 90% of the words on their own. 

Children find it difficult to concentrate on the main message of the story if you have to stop more frequently to decipher words.

6. Discuss the books they are reading. 

They are better able to recall and analyse the book’s topics because to this “verbal processing.” 

To promote reading comprehension, pose questions before, during, and after a session.